Family gathering at Sussex Inlet – August 2014

The Inlet at low tide in the evening

The Inlet at low tide in the evening

 

We went to the Sussex Inlet for a family reunion. We have been there for short holiday stays many times over the years. The inlet is bordering a national park situated in the Capital Territory near Jervis Bay.

 

There we stay at a Railway Union Holiday camp. It is at the end of 13 km dirt track. The winding track is ideal for jogging and many a times, in previous years, we have been running out and back.

 

Kangaroo could break suddenly out of the bushes.

Kangaroos could break suddenly out of the bushes.

 

Soon after our  arrival the sun set.  Usually Kangaroos are awaiting us, but non was to be seen on the first evening. A single  Brush Wallaby made a short appearance to the delight of our youngest member of the family.

 

Lucas is meeting the locals

Lucas is meeting the locals

 

Next morning we saw lots of birds. A Kookaburra came to visit and even tried to take a bite out my finger.

 

The Kookaburra - the laughing bird

The Kookaburra – the laughing bird

 

More interesting are the Crimson Rosella. They watch us and hope for a tasty snack.

 

Grandson Ryan is getting friendly with the birds

Grandson Ryan is getting friendly with the birds

Lucas and his mother Ebony

Lucas and his mother Ebony

 

 

 

 

 

 

After breakfast we all went for a long walk along the track and then back along Bherwerre Beach. We stopped at a little pick-nick spot   on the shore of St Georges Basin.

 

St Georges Basin

St Georges Basin

 

The place is actually called “Lone Pine”. And here is why.

 

The "Lone Pine"

The “Lone Pine”

We took a group photo, or two, at the “Lone Pine” spot.

 

 

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Ryan and son Lucas

Ryan and son Lucas

Beautiful smelling blossoms

Beautiful smelling blossoms

 

 

 

 

 

 

From there we set off for a stroll to the beach.

 

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Soon we walked through the dunes.

 

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And suddenly we could see what we came for. We all stumbled through the sand but were happy when we saw and heard the rolling surf. It is all part of the Booderee National Park .

The Tasman Sea - next stop New Zealand

The Tasman Sea – next stop New Zealand

 

We  rested for a while before we set off for the 2 km beach walk.

 

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At first we did not see any other people other than our little group. Much later two anglers were proud to show us their catch. We started off on our walk back.

 

The red shoes tried to do it alone.

The red shoes tried to do it alone.

 

A dead seal who did not make it.

A seal who did not make it.

 

The younger ones went ahead......

The younger ones went ahead……

 

...and we two oldies were a bit slower

…and we two oldies were a bit slower

 

The two angler....

The two anglers ….

...and their catch

…and their catch

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is me carrying the tired shoes

This is me carrying the tired shoes

 

At the end of our walk

At the end of our walk

We reached the inlet, tired but happy.

 

Our daughter Caroline prepared a beautiful lunch which we enjoyed very much.

 

....the cook

….the cook

The meal and...

The meal and…

 

 

 

 

After the lunch it was time to relax with the birds. At least this is what Matthew did.

 

Are you looking for answers, Matthew?

Are you looking for answers, Matthew?

 

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In the evening we all came together in Martin’s cabin. The younger ones played a tournament of card games. Matthew and Caroline won.

Martin, Ryan, Roxy, Mitch

Martin, Ryan, Roxy, Mitch

Monika, Troy, Natasha

Monika, Troy, Natasha

Ryan, Monika, Martin

Ryan, Monika, Martin

After the games some refreshments

After the games some refreshments

Next morning it was misty and slow rain fell and only the Kangaroos and a ghost were out.

Mr and Mrs Roo

Mr and Mrs Roo

The white ghost

The white ghost

It is a last “Good bye” to the Kangaroos.

 

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A last chat.

A last chat.

 

One more snap

One more snap

And we leave with good memories which will last longer then the tracks we left in the sand at the beach. We did not go for a swim but summer is not too far away and we can always go to the local beach or pool.

 

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Hold-up at the Art Precinct

We had reason to go to Wollongong, the largest city in the Illawarra, and on the way back to the car I saw a large picture on the wall. Street art, I presume.

 

Mythical figure?

Mythical figure?

 

I was intrigued. What was it? An animal or a tree trunk? There seemed to be flying birds and falling leafs.  Beside was a sign.

 

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Ah, I was at the art precinct and they told me that I was under observation. I did nor know art was dangerous to warrant CCTV. As you can see on the sign it showed the way into a rather dark alley.  I felt I had to investigate a bit further. And found a triptych of horror.

Triptych of Horror

Triptych of Horror

 

I can not see any connection between the three pictures of the panel.

I went back to the street and to my surprise found three character with doubtful intentions.

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My favourite

My favourite

 

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After seeing those three, I wanted to get the hell out of there. I was lucky on the other side of the street Uta  was waiting for me near a safe sanctuary.

 

Anglican Church - Kembla Street

Anglican Church – Kembla Street

 

 ps. This blog is published also in German at pethan35.wordpress.com

8th Sunday after Trinity

Today is Sunday. It is supposed to be a day of rest and recuperation. They used to say, it is the Lord’s Day. A day that belonged to something other than ourselves. And, in a roundabout way it is for our renewal.

 

We have to get away from the daily grind and our struggle for existence. That was the idea of the Sabbath of the old Jewish calendar. Even God needed a day of rest after the Creation; and he saw, all was good. Was it really?

When I was a child and looked out a window I noticed straight away when it was Sunday.  The streets were quieter and  emptier. People were dressed differently than they were on weekdays. Today I can’t see the street. I look at the bush as it always looks. It is green and the birds are flying from tree to tree as they always did. For them, it is always the Lord’s Day. We have to be reminded.

 

As we, Uta and I, were sitting at the table, having breakfast with a soft-boiled egg, we switched on the radio, as we do in the mornings, to listen to “our ABC” and the beautiful music they usually broadcast. And who better to start Sunday with than no other than Johann Sebastian Bach. They were plying the first movement of his Brandenburg concerto no. 4.

 

 

 

Brandenburg is the land of my forefathers and Berlin is its  main city. It has a beautiful landscape, where human hand has improved on what nature, from the Ice Age on, has provided.

Here begins Brandenburg when you come from Mecklenburg

Here begins Brandenburg when you come from Mecklenburg

After the concerto they played a cantata by Bach as they do every Sunday. The right one for the right day, as it was done when he was at the Thomas Church at Leipzig.

They played the cantata BWV 178: “If the Lord God does not stay with us”. This cantata has been especially being composed for the 8th Sunday after Trinity. After checking this cantata out I realised, how opportune it is for just our time.

 

The music of the cantata  is of course beautiful and powerful, even if one is not a believer. For  a secular person, like me, it tells me, that when we lose our moral compass then nothing will help us. Our immorality makes our enemies stronger and we can see it everywhere in the world today.

The wrong god, Mammon,  is running the show and that is why Sunday has been turned into just another shopping day. There is no Sabbath any more and the more we move away from the Enlightenment, the more the fundamentalists of this world will cause upheaval. The Yazidi, stuck on Mount Sinjar in Northern Iraq, suffer for the greed and corruption of the West. The gods are angry and do not stay with us.

I’m not pleading for a new god. I’m pleading fore a  morality  where the balance sheet  is not the guiding principle. Countries are being run for the benefit of the corporations and not for the benefit of the people as a whole. We are being told to work more for less. But the wealth so created is ending up  in the pockets of the few. The environment is being destroyed. Countries are being bombed to smithereens.

 

It is time we we take back our Sabbath  or our Sunday and pause once in a while and consider the outcomes of our wrong actions and may be, “the Lord might once again smile at us.”  The lessons of 8th Sunday after Trinity must be learnt. Bach knew about it two hundred and ninety years ago.

 

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View of Mount Kembla, Illawarra, NSW